Kimberly Reiter

Associate Professor of History

Reiter has had extensive experience designing and teaching courses in environmental history and environmental issues and has presented and published papers on the teaching of environmental history from a supradisciplinary perspective. She is past chair of the Stetson Faculty Senate, current chair of the Undergraduate Research Committee and coordinator of the Public History concentration and a CUR Councilor.

  • PhD, University of Virginia

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Kimberly Reiter

Biography

Kimberly Reiter is an associate professor of ancient and medieval history at Stetson University and coordinator of the public history concentration. Reiter has had extensive experience designing and teaching courses in environmental history and environmental issues and has presented and published papers on the teaching of environmental issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. 

She currently serves as a member of the IEA Roundtable on Sustainable Human and Environmental Systems (SHES) curricula. She also directs the Stetson field course in early English history, an on-site interdisciplinary study of the historic English landscape. She advises the Stetson chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the history honors society, is chair of the Stetson Undergraduate Research Committee, organizes the annual Stetson Undergraduate Research and Creative Arts Symposium (Showcase), the campus-wide honors day, and serves as a national councilor for the Undergraduate Research Directors Division for the Council of Undergraduate Research (CUR). She is the past Chair of the Stetson Faculty Senate and past president of the Interdisciplinary Environmental Association (IEA). Currently, she chairs the CUR Fellows Committee.

Her scholarship focuses on imperialism in the Western Roman Empire, specifically the Aquitaine Basin, and in the differing perceptions of "Romanization," especially its application as a theoretical construct in explaining imperialism, change and continuity in Roman provincial society and art. She has contributed a recent Festschrift article on the application of Romanization theories to the teaching of Iron Age European religious thought. Reiter has also contributed chapters to the Halifax River Urban Watershed project, on the environmental impacts of Volusia County transportation and river systems, co-written a textbook in western civilization, and presented work on the use of Stonehenge as a pedagogical tool in understanding sustainability. She is working on a book on framing supradisciplinary STEM issues for non-STEM students based on her NEH Enduring Questions grant.

More About Kimberly Reiter

Areas of Expertise

  • Roman History
  • English History
  • Environmental History
  • Maritime History

Course Sampling

  • History of Piracy
  • Naval History
  • The Ancient Near East
  • History of Ancient Greece
  • History of Ancient Rome
  • Celtic Civilization
  • Fall of the Roman Empire
  • Early English History
  • Historiography of King Arthur
  • Stonehenge
  • Environmental History
  • The Early English Landscape (taught on site in Britain)

  • Romanization as an intellectual construct
  • Sustainability curricula
  • Prehistoric England

  • 2023: “Wheels: Historic Transportation Systems and Landscape in the Halifax Watershed” In: Cho, H. and M. A. Reiter eds. The Halifax River Urban Watershed Project II
  • 2022: Reiter, M. A. and K. D. Reiter. “Approaches to Undergraduate Research in Sustainability”. In: Mieg, H. ed. International Handbook on Undergraduate Research, Cambridge Press. (publication May 2023)
  • 2020: “Historical Human-Induced Impacts on the Watershed”. In: Cho, H. and M. A. Reiter eds. The Halifax River Urban Watershed Project
  • 2018: “Course Design: An Example of an Advanced Undergraduate Course for the Salisbury Plain” in Will Focht, Michael A. Reiter, Paul A. Barresi, Richard C. Smardon, eds. Education for Sustainable Human and Environmental Systems: From Theory to Practice, 1st Edition Routledge
  • 2017: IEA Roundtable,  An approach to education for sustainable human and environmental systems Chapter 10: “Stonehenge as a SHES based Course” Routledge.
  • The West in Question: Continuity and Change, (Western Civilization Textbook, with Kimberly Reiter). New York: Prentice Hall-Pearson.
  • The Origins of the Environmental Systems and Sustainability Roundtables: Design, Core Competencies, and Certification/Accreditation of Interdisciplinary Environmental Academic Programs Interdisciplinary Environmental Review (forthcoming)
  • "Making Education for Sustainability Work on Your Campus: The Roundtables on Environmental Systems and Sustainability," In: W. Leal Filho, Pub. 2011. World Trends on Education for Sustainable Development, vol. 32 of the series Environmental Education, Communication and Sustainability, Peter Lang Scientific Publishers, Frankfurt, Germany.