Stetson University

Courses - The Hague, Netherlands

Track 1 Courses

Week 1
(July 4 - July 7, 2016)

Elder Law - Global Aging (1 credit)
Instructor: Roberta Flowers, Stetson University College of Law

Almost 10,000 people in the US are turning 65 every day. This aging of the population is not unique to the US, however. Many countries are facing myriad issues regarding aging populations at all levels of government and society including the use of courts to handle the issues. Some countries have started to look at aging as a human right. The UN is looking at a draft convention now, following up the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Organization of American States is also considering action regarding the human rights of older persons. This course will cover these developments as well as look at how countries have addressed the issues of aging. This course will look at the issues from both a systemic and practical perspective, including a skills component to teach the students some of the skills necessary to advocate for their elderly clients.

Week 2
(July 11-14 2016)

Administrative Law in the EU and the U.S. (1 credit)
Instructor: Linda Jellum, Mercer University School of Law

This course will examine the procedural rules and method of norm creation for administrative law generally, and food and drug laws specifically, in both the European Union (EU) and the United States (US). Understanding how laws are created is essential to understanding whether they can effect the intended change.

The EU is a transnational government of an unusual kind. It began with an economic trade treaty centered on the manufacture of coal and steel and the regulation of atomic energy. Today, the EU is much more than a coal and steel community, governing almost every area of European life, include food, wine, and drugs. The EU has tremendous global influence. No other regulatory regime outside the US affects American businesses and individuals as regularly and intensively as the EU. For example, in 2011, the European Commission, the EU's executive/administrative body, expanded its Regulation on Products used for Capital Punishment and Torture to include “products which could be used for the execution of human beings by means of lethal injection,” including “short and intermediate acting barbiturate anaesthetic agents” like pentobarbital and sodium thiopental, among others. This amendment prohibits European pharmaceutical manufacturers from exporting drugs used for executions in the United States unless the manufacturers have a special permit showing that the export will not be used for executions. Some now ask whether the EU will effectively end lethal injection in the US.

It is no more possible to provide a detailed comparative study of EU law in four days than it would be possible to study the whole of American law in that short time-frame. Hence, the objective of this course will be to introduce the topics and begin the discussion. Thus, the course will cover the way in which the EU was created and now operates. It will explore the unique legal systems in the EU and the US and the way in which legal norms are generated. In doing so, the course will explore the similarities and differences of these two complex legal systems, focusing specifically on US and EU food and drug laws.

Week 3
(July 18-21, 2016)

Family Law and International Tribunals: The Hague Convention on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction  (1 credit)
Instructor: Timothy Arcaro, Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad Law Center

This course will explore the promulgation, implementation, and mechanics of the Hague Convention on Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Convention). The Convention may be a bilateral and/or multilateral instrument between member states. This course will explore the accession and ratification process to the Convention and the mutual obligations members states have for the enforcement of Convention provisions. From global jurisprudence to individual state jurisprudence, the course will explore the overall effectiveness of the Convention and how individual state parties meet their obligations under the Convention. The course will also examine the specific elements that must be met in every Request for Return Petition. The Convention has created international tribunals for family court proceedings within fairly narrow parameters. It provides an opportunity to critically examine global jurisprudence on civil aspects of international child abduction.

Week 4
(July 25-28, 2016)

Contemporary International Problems in Internet and Technology Law (1 credit)
Instructor: Jorge Roig, Charleston School of Law

The course explores contemporary problems related to the Internet and other recently developed high technologies, such as digital video and audio recording and sharing, 3D printing, genetic manipulation, etc. In particular, the proposed course would look at how these new technologies create legal issues in the international context. Specific topics discussed would include:

· Jurisdiction and choice of law
· Freedom of Expression, Privacy and Personhood
· Intellectual Property

Some questions to be addressed: What happens when speech is published in the Internet and becomes accessible around the world, but different jurisdictions want to apply different standards for freedom of expression? How do we enforce national laws violated via the Internet when the violators are located halfway across the globe? Should disputes regarding intellectual property be handled in international fora? Can we make effective and efficient dispute resolution mechanisms available via nongovernmental organizations specialized in certain technologies? How will jurisdictions control the free sharing via the Internet of designs for 3D printing that might facilitate crime or infringe intellectual property rights? How do we maintain control over manipulation of the human genetic germ line when different countries have different regulations and enforcement mechanisms?


Track 2 Courses

Week 1
(July 4 - July 7, 2016)

Elder Law - Global Aging (1 credit)
Instructor: Rebecca Morgan, Stetson University College of Law

Almost 10,000 people in the US are turning 65 every day. This aging of the population is not unique to the US, however. Many countries are facing myriad issues regarding aging populations at all levels of government and society including the use of courts to handle the issues. Some countries have started to look at aging as a human right. The UN is looking at a draft convention now, following up the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Organization of American States is also considering action regarding the human rights of older persons. This course will cover these developments as well as look at how countries have addressed the issues of aging. This course will look at the issues from both a systemic and practical perspective, including a skills component to teach the students some of the skills necessary to advocate for their elderly clients.

Week 2
(July 11-14 2016)

Comparative Constitutional Law (1 credit)
Instructor: Jared Goldstein, Roger Williams University School of Law

This course seeks to expose students to the similarities and differences among constitutional systems. The four-day course will cover the following subjects:

• Day One—the nature of constitutional systems and basic constitutionalmodels.
• Day Two—the role of courts in constitutional systems and how different constitutional systems assign authority for interpreting and enforcing the constitution.
• Day Three—horizontal separation of powers and how different constitutional systems allocate executive, legislative, and judicial powers.
• Day Four—selected issues in comparative individual rights, including social welfare rights, abortion, and affirmative action.

Week 3
(July 18-21, 2016)

Comparative Civil Dispute Resolution (1 credit)
Instructor: William Janssen, Charleston School of Law

Often overlooked amidst the emphasis on the public law mission of international courts and tribunals is the critical role played by international dispute resolution systems in addressing private, commercial disputes. As the globe continues to shrink, and the advent of Internet-based marketplace platforms proliferate, even the most local of interests can acquire a trans-border dimension. Effectively and reliably resolving trans-border commercial disputes is an increasingly important skill for new lawyers.

This course introduces students to conventional Nation-based adjudicative tribunals in Europe and elsewhere, to international adjudicative systems and tribunals, and to the challenges of jurisdiction and foreign judgment enforcements in trans-border commercial litigation. The course also introduces students to non-judicial adjudicative tribunals and how those tribunals offer an attractive trans-border dispute resolution alternative. The course has students role-play in simulated negotiation / mediation exercises. The course’s goal is to impart an appreciation of the challenges of trans-border civil dispute resolution, and to expose students to creative opportunities available through alternative international dispute resolution paths.

Week 4
(July 25-28, 2016)

International Law and Literature (1 credit)
Instructor: Sarah Gerwig-Moore, Mercer University School of Law

This seminar will focus primarily on discussions and depictions of European and International law and legal themes in a variety of literary texts. Reading and discussing together, we will explore archetypes and stereotypes of lawyers and clients; themes of mercy, justice, rules, order, process; consider the evolution of law; and consider our place in all of this as servants (or subversives) of the law. The course will focus in particular upon works of European authors.

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See the world while earning class credit in one of Stetson's many study abroad programs. In an increasingly global society, Stetson University College of Law enables you to discover new lands and foreign legal systems through several international study opportunities, including:

Autumn in London
Summer Abroad Programs
  Argentina
  China
  Netherlands
  Spain
Cayman Islands Winter Break Program
International Student Exchange

 

For more information, see International Programs Office or Study Abroad FAQ (PDF) or contact us at international@law.stetson.edu.

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