Stetson University

Faculty - The Hague, Netherlands

Resident Director: Mark Bauer
Professor of Law
Stetson University College of Law

Mark Bauer is a Professor of Law teaching Antitrust, Administrative Law, Property, Consumer Protection, and Financial Advocacy. He also supervises Stetson's internship program in Elder Consumer Protection Law and Stetson's Full Semester Federal Agency Externship. Professor Bauer served as Stetson's Associate Dean for Academics from 2009-2011.

Before joining the faculty, Professor Bauer clerked for the Honorable William R. Robie, chief immigration judge of the United States. Following his clerkship, Professor Bauer joined the Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Competition, where he worked on cases involving high profile mergers and other anticompetitive conduct. After leaving the Federal Trade Commission, Professor Bauer moved to Chicago to practice antitrust law in the private sector with two large law firms. He represented one of the defendants in a multi-billion dollar multi-district price fixing case, and counseled other major public corporations on antitrust and consumer protection matters.

Professor Bauer wrote and edited a new treatise on state unfair trade practice laws for CCH/Wolters Kluwer, and then joined the Chicago-Kent College of Law faculty in a fellowship position where he taught antitrust, administrative law, and legal writing. Professor Bauer received his bachelor's degree in political science from the University of Chicago, where he received the Howell Murray award for outstanding contributions to the university. He received his law degree from Emory University, where he was a member of the Moot Court Honor Society, and taught first-year legal research and writing.

Professor Bauer's research interests are wide ranging; he has written in the areas of antitrust, administrative law, consumer protection, property, and higher education, often drawing connections between them. In antitrust, he is particularly interested in the doctrine's impact on the non-profit sector, retail, and its interplay with consumer protection law. Professor Bauer speaks frequently on antitrust and consumer protection issues at law schools, conferences, and before advocacy groups around the world. His research has been quoted in the New York Times and in major newspaper editorials.

At Stetson, Professor Bauer has promoted financial literacy and consumer education for law students by creating and teaching his for-credit weekend-long Financial Advocacy course. He has taught International and Comparative Competition Law in Stetson's summer abroad programs in China, Estonia, Spain, and Argentina. Professor Bauer has also coached Stetson's Law and Economics moot court team, and co-coached its Arbitration team.

Professor Bauer has supported the work of the Stetson's Centers for Excellence in Elder Law and Higher Education Law through speaking engagements and research. Professor Bauer has also been active in professional associations, serving as Chair of the Education Law and Aging and the Law Sections for the Association of American Law School, and was a member of the Steering Committee for the Southeastern Association of Law Schools.

In 2011 Bauer was a visiting scholar at Queen Mary, University of London, and was Academic Director of Stetson's Autumn in London Semester Study Abroad Program. Professor Bauer has been a Senior International Fellow and Visiting Scholar at the University of Melbourne in Australia, and was named a Distinguished International Fellow to the Canadian Centre for Elder Law. In 2013 Professor Bauer was awarded Stetson's Branton Excellence in Teaching Award.


Roberta Flowers
Professor of Law and Co-director, Center for Excellence in Elder Law
Stetson University College of Law

Roberta K. Flowers is a professor of law at Stetson University College of Law. Within the Elder Law LL.M. program, Professor Flowers teaches Ethics in an Elder Law Practice. She also teaches Evidence, Criminal Procedure, and Professional Responsibility. While at Stetson, Professor Flowers has successfully coached trial teams, arbitration teams and moot court teams to national championships. She has served as the director of the Center for Excellence in Advocacy and as the William Reece Smith Jr. Distinguished Professor in Professionalism. During her time at Stetson, Professor Flowers has received the university-level Excellence in Teaching Award, Most Inspirational Teacher Award from the Student Bar Association, and an award from the Student Bar Association for supporting student life. She also has received the university-level Homer and Dolly Hand Award for Excellence in Scholarship, the Dean's Award for Extraordinary Service, and been awarded the Distinguished Service Award four times. In 2005, the Florida Supreme Court awarded Professor Flowers the Faculty Professionalism Award.
Professor Flowers has lectured worldwide on the topic of ethics. She won a Telly Award for Excellence in Educational Films for having produced a series of educational videos on the ethical issues faced by prosecuting attorneys. Along with Professor Rebecca Morgan, she created a video series used to train and educate attorneys nationwide on the ethical dilemmas faced by elder law attorneys. The Florida Supreme Court awarded Professor Morgan and Professor Flowers the Florida Supreme Court Professionalism Award for their video productions. Additionally, with Professor Morgan, Professor Flowers designed the nation's first "elder friendly courtroom," which serves as model for courtrooms of the future.

Before arriving at Stetson, Professor Flowers worked as a prosecutor in both the state and federal system. She began her career in 1984 as a deputy district attorney for the 18th Judicial District of Colorado, where she served as a trial attorney in the criminal division. In 1989, she was appointed assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Florida, where she served in the Appellate Division, the Major Crimes Unit and the Public Corruption Unit.

Professor Flowers graduated magna cum laude from Baylor University in 1979 with a bachelor's degree in psychology. She received her J.D. from the University of Colorado in 1984, where she was selected to be a member of the Order of the Coif.

Professor Flowers' research interests center on the issues of ethics and professionalism. Professor Flowers' articles have appeared in such journals as the Fordham Law Review, the Boston College Law Review, Missouri Law Review, the Nebraska Law Review, the Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law, Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly, the Stetson Law Review, and the NAELA Journal.

Professor Flowers is active in several professional associations. She has served on numerous committees of The Florida Bar, including the Professional Ethics Committee, the Evidence Committee, and the Standing Committee on Professionalism. She is currently the chair of the Professionalism Sub-Committee of the Litigation Section's Ethics and Professionalism Committee of the American Bar Association.


William Janssen
Professor of Law
Charleston School of Law

William M. Janssen joined the Charleston School of Law faculty in 2006 after a lengthy practice with the mid-Atlantic law firm of Saul Ewing LLP, where he was a litigation partner, a member of the firm’s seven-person governing executive committee, and chair of the interdisciplinary Life Sciences Practice Group. He concentrated his practice in pharmaceutical, medical device, and mass torts defense and risk containment. In practice, he was involved in several high-profile drug and device cases, including the national diet drug (“fen-phen”) litigations, DES litigations, and myelographic contrast dye litigations. He has spoken and written extensively on pharmaceutical and medical device law.

Professor Janssen also focuses his scholarship on federal practice and procedure. He is the author of four national texts in this discipline. He is the sole author of Federal Civil Procedure Logic Maps (West 2d ed. 2012), a visual learning resource for federal civil procedure, and one of two authors of Mastering Multiple Choice – Federal Civil Procedure (West 2014), a multiple-choice practice tool. He is one of three co-authors of the Federal Civil Rules Handbook (West, annually (22nd ed. 2014)), and A Student’s Guide to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (West, annually (17th ed. 2014)). The content of the Handbook is reprinted each year as Volume 12B of the national treatise, Wright & Miller’s Federal Practice and Procedure (West). In addition, Professor Janssen is the author of various journal articles, book chapters, and bar review materials on federal civil procedure, and has lectured widely on civil procedure topics.
Professor Janssen’s scholarship also includes an emphasis on constitutional religious liberty and the Religion Clauses to the United States Constitution, an area of law on which he has written, spoken, and litigated. He is also one of several co-authors of the annual updating to Rice’s Attorney-Client Privilege in the United States, a leading treatise on the privilege.

While a student at the American University’s Washington College of Law, Professor Janssen was the executive editor of the American University Law Review, a dean’s fellow, a moot court board member, an interschool moot court competitor, and the first-year moot court champion. After law school, he served as a law clerk to a federal district court judge (Hon. James McGirr Kelly, E.D. Pa.) and to a federal court of appeals judge (Hon. Joseph F. Weis, Jr., 3d Cir.).

Before joining the Charleston School of Law faculty, Professor Janssen taught as an adjunct instructor at Temple University School of Law for five academic terms and as an adjunct teaching business law at Saint Joseph’s University.


Rebecca Morgan
Boston Asset Management Chair in Elder Law and Co-director, Center for Excellence in Elder Law
Stetson University College of Law

Rebecca C. Morgan is the Boston Asset Management Faculty Chair in Elder Law, the director of the Center for Excellence in Elder Law at Stetson University College of Law and the director of Stetson's online LL.M. in Elder Law. Professor Morgan teaches a variety of elder law courses in the J.D. and LL.M. programs and oversees the elder law concentration program for J.D. students. She is the successor co-author of Matthew Bender's Tax, Estate and Financial Planning for the Elderly, and its companion forms book (Lexis), a co-author of Representing the Elderly in Florida, (Lexis), The Fundamentals of Special Needs Trusts (Lexis), Ethics in an Elder Law Practice (ABA) and Planning for Disability (Bloomberg BNA Portfolio). She is a member of the elder law editorial board for Matthew Bender. Professor Morgan has authored a number of articles on a variety of elder law issues and has spoken a number of times on subjects of elder law. She is the co-editor of the Elder Law Prof Blog, http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/ (with Kim Dayton (William Mitchell) and Katherine Pearson (Penn State).

Professor Morgan is a past president of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, past president of the board of directors of the National Senior Citizens Law Center, past chair of the American Association of Law Schools Section on Aging and the Law and of the Florida Bar Elder Law Section, and on the faculty of the National Judicial College. She served as the reporter for the Uniform Guardianship and Protective Proceedings Act. She served on the Florida Attorney General's Task Force on Elder Abuse and the Florida Legislative Guardianship Study Commission. She is a member of the American Law Institute (ALI), academic advisory board for the Borchard Center for Law and Aging, an academic fellow of the American College of Trusts & Estates Counsel (ACTEC), a NAELA fellow, and a member of NAELA's Council of Advanced Practitioners (chair 2012-2014). After a term on the Board of the ABA Commission on Law and Aging, she is a special advisor to the ABA Commission on Law and Aging. She is a member of the board of directors for the Center for Medicare Advocacy.

Professor Morgan was the recipient of the 2003 Faculty Award on Professionalism from the Florida Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism. She received the NAELA Unaward in November 2004 from President Stu Zimring for her accomplishments in the field of elder law. Professor Morgan, along with Professor Roberta Flowers, received the 2005 Project Award on Professionalism from the Florida Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism for their video series on ethics in an elder law practice. She received the 2006 Rosalie Wolf Memorial Elder Abuse Prevention Award from the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse. She received the Homer & Dolly Hand Award for Faculty Scholarship in May of 2008, and the NAELA President's Award from NAELA President Mark Shalloway in May of 2008. She received the Theresa Award from the Theresa Alexandra Foundation in 2008. Professor Morgan was the 2009 recipient of the Treat award from the National College of Probate Judges.


Amanda Padoan
Adjunct Professor of Law
Pepperdine University School of Law

Amanda Padoan earned a B.A with honors from Harvard and a J.D. from Pepperdine. She has taught Criminal Procedure at Pepperdine University School of Law. Before joining Pepperdine's London faculty, she was a trial prosecutor in Fresno and Orange counties, California. Her book, Buried in the Sky, received the NCTE George Orwell Award for distinguished contribution to honesty and clarity in public language.


James Sheehan
Director of Tampa Law Center and Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

Stetson University College of Law

Professor James A. Sheehan is an alumnus of Stetson University College of Law, having graduated with honors in 1977. Since that time, he has been in private practice in the Tampa Bay area.

Professor Sheehan began his legal career with the City of Tampa where he served as an assistant city attorney from 1977-1981. After that, he was an insurance defense litigator for a couple of years before going to work doing general litigation for his old boss, Warren Cason, the former city attorney of the City of Tampa. In 1984, he started his own firm and has been a sole practitioner ever since, doing a variety of civil litigation, administrative law and appellate work in both state and federal courts.

About five years ago, he began a second career as a fiction writer. He has published two legal thrillers, The Mayor of Lexington Avenue and The Law of Second Chances, and has recently completed his third book, The Alligator Man, which has not yet gone to publication.

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