PACT TablingPACT GroupPACT Consent Bar

PACT Programming

Red Zone Green

The first six weeks of a semester, particularly in the fall semester, is when the highest amount of sexual assaults take place on a college campus. To encourage students to be active bystanders during this time, we table with a “What Would You Do?” Conversation wheel. This wheel has questions and conversation prompts that challenge participants to think through their bystander strategies. During these tables, we also offer Title IX resources and off campus resources.

Consent Bar

The Consent Bar offers Mocktails to Start a Conversation. Able to cater to any event, PACT has created a menu of mocktails with names such as “Can I kiss you?” or “Can I take your pants off?” with the aim of destigmatizing and normalizing conversation around sex and consent. If you can say it to order a drink, you can certainly say it to your partner!

Sexversations

Created by the OneStudent organization, sexversations is an interactive card game filled with conversation prompts about sexual health, consent, gender roles, sexual assault, and sexuality as a whole. Sharing ideas around these topics help tackle the taboos that can hinder reporting or seeing a health professional. This casual and informative program can be adapted for large or small groups. PACT offers Sexversations about once a semester, but could host for a specific group if requested.

Escalation Workshop

New to PACT this year, we will be offering the Escalation Workshop created by the OneLove Foundation. This workshop includes a 40 minute video of a couple’s relationship and the way abuse can escalate. A guided discussion takes place after viewing the film to help participants identify the warning signs they witnessed in the fictional couple’s relationship, as well as work through their personal bystander strategies. PACT offers this workshop to the whole campus community once a year in October, but will host for specific groups if requested.

Defining Masculinity

This collaborative series seeks to break down the harmful gender roles men are socialized with that contribute to violence. Defining masculinity asks tough questions like, “What does it mean to be a man?” “What place do gender roles have in our society today?” “What does masculinity mean to us as individuals?” These discussion based events don’t seek to prescribe answers to these questions, but to challenge previously held beliefs and allow participants to examine the type of person they want to be, and how gender socialization impacts that. In addition to about two workshops a semester, the defining masculinity series includes posters showcasing how men on campus view masculinity.

Clothesline Project

The Clothesline Project is a way to express the feelings that come with abuse or assault, as well as a way to offer support to survivors. In collaboration with The WellTeam, blank t-shirts and writing materials are provided at a table for participants to create what they want on a t-shirt. The shirts are hung across palm court for a week in April in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

Take Back the Night

Every April, PACT and the Title IX Office present Take Back the Night. Take Back the Night was founded after a survivor of sexual assault on campus expereinced victim blaming. She and her community rose up and decided to take back the night, stating that everyone has the right to feel safe. This event includes keynote speakers, creative partnerships from students, a march, and a speak-out where the mic is opened to survivors or anyone who wishes to share their story.

Denim Day

Denim Day was started after an Itallian Supreme Court case that overturned a rape conviction on the grounds that a survivor was wearing tight jeans, and must have helped her attacker remove them, thereby implying consent. The community, including the women in Itallian Parliament were outraged. In a demonstration of support and solidarity with the survivor, all the women in Itallian Parliament wore jeans to work the next day. Denim Day is now celebrated annually to reject victim blaming and support survivors.