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Past Events

2014-15 Social Justice Lecture

"Entrepreneurism for Social Change: Inside Stories of Making the World Better, One Company at a Time"

A Lecture/Discussion by Patrick Davis,
Stetson alumnus, CEO of Davis Brand Capital and Co-Founder of StandUp Foundation

» Listen to the Recorded Lecture

  • Feb. 18, 2015, Stetson Room, Carlton Union Building, DeLand campus
  • Feb. 19, 2015, Great Hall, College of Law, Gulfport

Patrick Davis

Panera. Chipotle. Nike. Progressive.

Stetson graduate Patrick Davis has advised these consumer-favorite brands among many others — plus a growing list of entrepreneurial disruptors from snack foods to beauty — that demonstrate the power of the private sector to help drive social change. 

Davis believes the future is being shaped by "socially-minded capitalists" - business and community leaders who answer new generational priorities and shifting market needs with brands that are based on a purposeful blend of entrepreneurism and social justice. Whether focused on animal and human welfare practices, safe-ingredient standards, or inclusion and anti-bullying policies, the businesses Davis works with and invests in realize the value
of the triple bottom line - making social entrepreneurism a
daring and critical driver for significant change.

2014-15 Social Justice Lecture

"Quiet, Justice, Love"

A Lecture/Discussion by Kevin Quashie, Ph.D.

» Listen to the Recorded Lecture

  • Oct. 14, 2014, Stetson Room, Carlton Union Building, DeLand campus
  • Oct. 15,2014, Mann Lounge, College of Law, Gulfport

Kevin Quashie

African-American culture is often considered expressive, dramatic and even defiant -- characterizations that are linked to the idea of resistance and to the yearning for justice. As a result, these terms come to dominate how we think of blackness.

What, then, could a concept of quiet mean to reimagining how we think about black culture, about resistance and justice?How could the idea of quiet, as a notion different from silence and as a metaphor for one's inner life, offer insight into how to be alive in ways that are aware of social violence but that retain the power and grace that is inevitable in the everyday act of being human?

Dr. Kevin Quashie is a professor in the department of Afro-American Studies at Smith College, where he teaches cultural studies and theory. He is the author or editor of three books, most recently The Sovereignty of Quiet: Beyond Resistance in Black Culture.

Additional Events:

Bookfeast with Kevin Quashie, Faculty Lounge, CUB

"Quiet, Justice, Love" Symposium led by Dr. Rajni Shankar-Brown, Rinker Auditorium, Lynn Business Center (LBC)

2013-14 Inaugural Social Justice Lectures

"Out of the Shadows: Building Inclusive Communities"

Lecture/Discussion by Susan Rankin, Ph.D.

» Listen to the Recorded Lecture

Feb. 12, 2014

Susan Rankin

Colleges and universities over time are more accurately reflecting the diverse makeup of society, in terms of race, class, gender, disabilities, sexual orientation and gender identity. They focus on fostering welcoming and inclusive environments for all, but to what extent are they successful? What is the influence of climate on "invisible" identities?

Susan Rankin, Ph.D., is a founding member of the Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals, which advocates for LGBT people on college campuses. Having collaborated with more than 70 institutions/organizations in developing strategic plans regarding social-justice issues, she demonstrates that these environments are not immune to negative societal attitudes and discriminatory behaviors. Widely published on this topic as it pertains to the academy and athletics, Rankin is a retired Penn State education professor, senior research associate and softball coach.

"So Rich, So Poor: Why It's So Hard to End Poverty in America"

Lecture/Discussion by Peter Edelman, based on his book of the same title

» Listen to the Recorded Lecture

  • Oct. 16, 2013, Stetson University, DeLand campus
  • Oct. 17, 2013, Stetson University College of Law, Gulfport campus

Peter Edelman

Peter B. Edelman is a lawyer, policy maker and law professor at Georgetown University Law Center, where he is faculty director of the Center on Poverty, Inequality and Public Policy.

Throughout his five decade career, Edelman has become one of America's leading anti-poverty advocates. As an advisor and legislative assistant to Sen. Robert F. Kennedy from 1964 to 1968, Edelman accompanied Kennedy on his 1967 tour of the Mississippi Delta to investigate the devastating conditions of families living there, an experience that would help shape his policy views on poverty in public service, teaching and as a scholar.

His books include Searching for America's Heart: RFK and the Renewal of Hope, published in 2001, and Reconnecting Disadvantaged Young Men, which he co-authored and was published in 2006. His most recent book is So Rich, So Poor: Why It's So Hard to End Poverty In America.

Edelman earned his B.A. from Harvard College and his law degree from Harvard Law School. He lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife, Marian Wright Edelman, founder and president of the Children's Defense Fund. He has been recognized as a J. Skelly Wright Memorial Fellow at Yale Law School, and is chair of the District of Columbia Access to Justice Commission; board chair of the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy; Public Welfare Foundation and the National Center for Youth Law; board president emeritus of the New Israel Fund; and a board member of the Center for Law and Social Policy, and the Center for American Progress Action Fund.