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Approved Courses

Service-Learning Courses

BIOL 444: Conservation Biology

This course investigates the levels of biological diversity (from genes to ecosystems), patterns of diversity, threats to diversity and the approaches and problems involved in conserving this diversity. As a class, students will investigate a question that has been identified by a community partner (e.g. Volusia County Environmental Management, Blue Spring State Park). After both field and library research, students will make a recommendation on a course of action related to the question posed. This recommendation will take the form of a report that outlines the biology/ecology of the organism(s) involved and what steps might be taken to protect or restore the ecosystem or habitat for an organism.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Kirsten Work, Ph.D., at kwork@stetson.edu.

BIOL 450: Plant Ecology

This course will give students a better understanding of plant growth, reproduction, anatomy and physiology as they relate to whole plant adaptation. Students in Plant Ecology will incorporate community service into the experiential portion of the course by partnering with a local entity responsible for the management/conservation of natural land. Specific partners and projects vary from year to year, with students working closely with agency officials in all cases to determine the experimental questions and design that will provide the partner with ecological data that will inform management decisions.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Cindy Bennington, Ph.D., at cbenning@stetson.edu.

COMM 327V / HLSC 327V: Health Communication

This course provides an introduction to the field of health communication, including origins and development, and an overview of several areas of the field such as information technologies in health communication, social support, the social construction of health, illness and health narratives, recipient-provider communication and communication in healthcare organizations. This course is designed to explore the question, "What is the role of communication in health and wellness?" and to encourage a lively exchange of ideas about various perspectives on health communication theory and the application to everyday health practices. Students will work with the Stetson University Office of Health and Wellness to provide materials, presentations and service for the university community.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Tara Schuwerk, Ph.D., at tschuwer@stetson.edu.

ECON 141V: Poverty and Microcredit

This course is for Stetson students interested in poverty and the people it has affected. Students will gain an awareness and understanding of people who have lived in a different situation than that in which they have lived. Students will also gain an understanding of the difficulties people face in trying to make a living and live a life. The service-learning component of this course will be met through interactive workshops with a community partner. The students will benefit from these workshops by helping people as they try to better their economic situation.

For more information, contact Ranjini Thaver, Ph.D., at rthaver@stetson.edu.

EDUC 302: Improving Reading & Writing Skills in the Middle/Secondary Schools

The overall course objective is to learn strategies for improving literacy among middle and secondary school youth. Students will demonstrate mastery of these strategies through their field experiences. Students will volunteer at the Boys and Girls Club and are also required to create content literacy lessons and complete one-on-one tutoring sessions using these lesson plans. Students must integrate at least one content area literacy strategy, which has been covered in the class material, into each lesson plan, reflecting understanding of culturally responsive pedagogy.

For more information, contact Rajni Shankar-Brown, Ph.D., at rshankar@stetson.edu.

ENTP 353V: Social Entrepreneurship

Social entrepreneurship is a rapidly developing and changing business field in which business and nonprofit leaders design, grow, and lead mission-driven enterprises. As the traditional lines blur between nonprofit enterprises, government, and business, it is critical that you understand the opportunities and challenges in this new landscape. In this course, students will focus on using entrepreneurial competencies to craft innovative responses to social problems, touching upon the broader fields of poverty and its causes, entrepreneurship as a mechanism of social justice and the challenges of starting and sustaining a social venture. This project will be completed in conjunction with La Plaza Communitaria and the Stetson Entrepreneurial Group and will require students to develop ideas for La Plaza that can help it better serve the Latino community in the DeLand area.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact William T. Jackson, D.B.A., at wjackson@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.02: Writing for the Health of It

Is writing good for your health? Scientific studies on the impact of writing on health - both emotional and physical - show remarkable results, supporting what those who love to read and write have known all along: the written word is powerful medicine. Where do writing, spirituality, and wellness meet? This course explores that intersection through a variety of texts, discussion and written responses. In addition, students will learn the sort of writing that has been found to be healing and have the opportunity to experience its potential through journaling and creative writing. This course includes a service-learning component, in which students will perform some tasks off-campus in the local community.

For more information, contact Gail Radley, Ph.D., at gradley@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.10: Self and World

This course is offered to first-year Bonner Program students only. It is designed to help students understand the forces that shape the individual as that individual acts in the world and the relationship of the self to the community and the ways that each shape each other. The service-learning component of this course will be met through a minimum of 10 hours of community engagement per week tutoring in Volusia County Elementary Schools.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Greg Sapp, Ph.D., at gsapp@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.37: Diversity in the 21st Century Classroom

In this course, students will examine the meaning of diversity and its relation to global education. Through literature and film, they will discuss the broad definition of diversity, focusing on the study of race, ethnicity, language, gender, social class, sexual orientation, religion and emotional and physical disabilities. All students will use field placements in local schools or nonprofit organizations to provide practical experiences that will illuminate the class' major concepts.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Elizabeth Heins, Ph.D. at eheins@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.49: Are We What We Eat? Food, Health, and Controversy

In this course, students will have lively discussions about food (fast, organic, wild, vegan, ethnic, and food stuffs, among others). In their exploration of food, ideas of nutrition and their personal and community health will be discussed. The students partner with a local grower in a service-learning project so that they may better understand and aid in locally grown, sustainable agriculture and how that plays a part in personal and community health.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Tara Schuwerk, Ph.D. at tschuwer@stetson.edu.

MGMT 465: Leading Organizational Change and Development

Students serve as a consulting team to an organization under direct mentorship of the professor. The students go through the primary five stages of organizational development and apply in-class learning on organizational development and change management to their consulting project efforts. Students work as “consultants” to their target organization by helping the organization to define managerial, leadership of human relations matters/issues/problems that need to be improved. They study relevant organizational dynamics, using appropriate methods, so as to make recommendations to the client organization regarding ways and means to best address the identified issues or problems within the given organization. Students produce a consulting research report and present their findings and the report to the client organization at the end of the semester.

For more information, contact Joy A. McGuirl-Hadley, Ed.D., at jhadley@stetson.edu.

SPAN 313L: Spanish in Communities: Latinos in the U.S.

In their work with the Spanish community, students will work with children or adults who speak Spanish and are learning to speak English. The course content focuses on how Hispanic communities developed in the United States, starting from the U.S. involvement in Latin American countries and the initial pushes to migrate to the U.S. The course content zeroes in on the issues faced in America by Hispanic communities. Students will volunteer with the ESOL Program of either Starke Elementary or La Casita Cultural.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Pamela Cappas-Toro, Ph.D., at pcappast@stetson.edu.

SPAN 397L: Internship in the Mexican-American Community

The course will focus primarily upon Latino/a issues in the United States, as well as the ways in which institutionalized oppression affects and impacts these groups. Throughout the semester, students will discuss various topics, including migration issues, education, gender, race, the U.S. Empire, Latino/a family detention centers and mass incarceration, DREAMERS, Civil Rights and the Chicano/Puerto Rican movement.

Students will also engage in service-learning at La Plaza Communitaria, a program which mainly focuses upon ESL education and adult computer literacy.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Pamela Cappas-Toro, Ph.D., at pcappast@stetson.edu.

Community Engagement Theory Course

AMST 360V/JS / HIST 360V: War and Peace in American History

This course focuses on the relation of war and peace in American history. Students will study large and small military engagements that have shaped American politics and culture and examples of individuals and groups striving for peace since the nation's founding. Through examining these histories, students will learn how war relates to the use of resources, connects to economic conditions and interests and generates deep debates over values. Questions over the nation's turns to organized violence touch on deep ethical and religious commitments and point to competing ways of defining American identity. The methodological focus of this class is on a theoretical understanding of ways to deal with community problems through evaluating contexts leading up to war, campaigns for war and peace in themselves and ways of coping with their consequences. Throughout the course, students will also be challenged to consider their own values in relation to the diverse ideological commitments connected to war and peace in American culture.

For more information, contact Paul Croce, Ph.D., at pcroce@stetson.edu.

BADM 209V: The Legal, Social and Ethical Environment of Business

This course is designed to investigate the broad range of ethical issues that contemporary managers face. From false advertising by local companies to environmental calamities caused by global corporations, students will examine ethical issues in business with the goal of developing an analytical framework for thinking about ethical problems in business. One of the primary learning outcomes for this course is for students to utilize critical thinking skills in confronting ethical issues in the context of business management. Students will be required to complete a Case Analysis, in which they choose a case study included in the course texts and complete a written analysis of their chosen case, where they will identify the ethical issues at stake in the course, describe who is affected by the issue, and propose ways in which the issue can be resolved.

For more information, contact Jim Beasley, Ph.D., at jbeasley@stetson.edu.

BADM 360V: Social Justice and the Bottom Line

In this course, students will develop a critical awareness of how a wide variety of business practices impacts issues of social justice. Students will reflect upon their own experiences in the business world and begin to think about how they may react to situations as future business leaders. The class will involve debate and discussion about issues regarding social justice and business practices. Additionally, a fundamental goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding of the broad concept of corporate social responsibility. Each semester, students will engage in community-based research to develop their understanding of corporate social responsibility. In previous semesters, for example, students have worked in small groups to develop a “Stetson Social Justice Index” in which each student group created a rubric for measuring social responsibility in businesses. Similar community-based research projects are conducted each time the course is offered.

For more information, contact John M. Tichenor, Ph.D., at jticheno@stetson.edu.

BIOL 444: Conservation Biology

This course investigates the levels of biological diversity (from genes to ecosystems), patterns of diversity, threats to diversity and the approaches and problems involved in conserving this diversity. The students tackle a research or restoration project and generate a written report on the subject. Students will produce a document that outlines the relevant research and make a recommendation of their own.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Kirsten Work, Ph.D., at kwork@stetson.edu.

BIOL 450: Plant Ecology

This course will give students a better understanding of plant growth, reproduction, anatomy and physiology as they relate to whole plant adaptation. Students will address ecological questions whose answers will aid foresters in determining the most appropriate methods for managing an area of habitat that is undergoing restoration. Depending upon the specific question they ask, students will use standard ecological methodologies (e.g., quadrat sampling, soil characterization) to compare three areas in the forest with similar abiotic characteristics but with different recent habitat management histories. Students will use the data to compare the three sites and to provide appropriate scientific explanations for their findings.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Cindy Bennington, Ph.D., at cbenning@stetson.edu.

COMM 327V / HLSC 327V: Health Communication

This course provides an introduction to the field of health communication, including origins and development and an overview of several areas of the field such as information technologies in health communication, social support, the social construction of health, illness and health narratives, recipient-provider communication and communication in healthcare organizations. Each semester the students partner with the Office of Health & Wellness at Stetson to work on health communication related projects/programs that are, in turn, delivered to the Stetson Community. Successful execution of the project requires full integration and application of concepts learned in the course.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Tara Schuwerk, Ph.D., at tschuwer@stetson.edu.

COMM 336V: Food and Nutrition in the Media

Through critical analysis of the media and cultural performance (gender, race, class, sexuality, age), this seminar is designed to explore possible influences on the perceptions of food and nutrition, and how, in turn, this may affect individuals’ well-being. In this class, students will design a workshop that could be presented to the community to increase media literacy about food/nutrition. Students will also identify problems with current media artifacts and present better approaches to constructing these artifacts.

For more information, contact Tara Schuwerk, Ph.D., at tschuwer@stetson.edu.

ECON 347V/JS: Local Economic Development

In this course, students will learn about the economics of local economic development, especially with reference to low-income families. A combination of theoretical and empirical analysis on asset allocation, poverty, finances and taxation will be undertaken. Students will partner with local community agencies such as United Way, The Campaign for Working Families, Community Foundation of East Central Florida, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Bank of America. Students will develop skills in personal finances and in preparing simple tax returns for working families. At the same time, students will gain first-hand experience on the multifaceted dimensions of poverty and the variety of ways in which governmental and non-governmental entities are attempting to create policies and procedures to empower working families.

For more information, contact Ranjini Thaver, Ph.D., at rthaver@stetson.edu.

ECON 379V: Economic Development and Human Progress

The majority of the course focuses on unpacking major issues within development and development economics—defining and measuring development, challenging stereotypes of poverty/understanding poverty’s deeply-rooted causes and discussing individuals’ roles in promoting progress and reducing poverty at the global, national, and local scales. Students will discuss the nature of development and debating its many push factors and barriers (i.e. industrialization, securing individual freedoms, education, income inequality). In a community-based research project, students are responsible for designing and implementing a survey that attempts to measure progress and perceptions of progress in the community.

For more information, contact Alan M. Green, Ph.D., at agreen1@stetson.edu.

EDUC 245H: Social Foundations of Education

This course examines the historical, philosophical and social forces affecting education today. Students will analyze current issues in education such as access to education, religion in education, student’s rights, curriculum and ethics. The main focus of community engagement in this course, however, is on bullying and how it impacts the community. Students in this course will work to propose solutions to stop bullying and analyze different preventative and responsive initiatives currently undertaken by schools.

For more information, contact Christopher Colwell, Ed.D., at ccolwell@stetson.edu.

EDUC 305V: Cultural Diversity Education

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills that will enable them to sensitively relate in culturally appropriate ways to individuals with diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. In this course, students will develop perspectives on cultural diversity that enhance their abilities to analyze contemporary cultural issues and respond to the issues impacting culturally diverse populations. Students will view the film Shadow of Hate and recommend two practical strategies to combat racism, sexism, economic discrimination, prejudices and racial discrimination. They will also discuss the potential benefits for creating a more harmonious and inclusive culture and discuss personal prejudices.

For more information, contact Patrick Coggins, Ph.D., at pcoggins@stetson.edu.

ENSS 310V/JS: Cultural and Political Ecology

This course functions as an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the tensions between economic development and management of natural environments. The course emphasizes the dynamic (dialectical) influences of humans and environment on each other. The concept of nature is questioned through the exploration of various paradigms for understanding the effects of economic development and underdevelopment on natural systems. An international context is stressed.

*Offered on an ad-hoc basis. Last offered in Fall 2013. Future dates are TBA.

For more information, contact Tony Abbott, Ph.D., at tabbott@stetson.edu.

ENTP 353/JS: Social Entrepreneurship

Social entrepreneurship is a rapidly developing and changing business field in which business and nonprofit leaders design, grow and lead mission-driven enterprises. As the traditional lines blur between nonprofit enterprises, government and business, it is critical that you understand the opportunities and challenges in this new landscape. In this course, students will focus on using entrepreneurial competencies to craft innovative responses to social problems, touching upon the broader fields of poverty and its causes, entrepreneurship as a mechanism of social justice and the challenges of starting and sustaining a social venture. Students will read and reflect on different entrepreneurial works in order to propose solutions to La Plaza Communitaria to enable progress and communication.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact William T. Jackson, D.B.A., at wjackson@stetson.edu.

FINA 375V: Collapse or Abundance: Prospects for the Environment, the World's Poor, and Accelerating Technology

This course examines whether economic growth is sustainable in terms of the environment, natural resources and being able to support the world's population at a level above mere subsistence living. Class discussion will center upon the question of whether or not accelerating technology will lead to abundance or misery for the majority of the world's population. Through each discussion and assignment, students will think critically not only about issues of supporting a growing global population, but also about how such issues may be mediated or solved.

For more information, contact James Mallett, Ph.D., at jmallett@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.02: Writing for the Health of It

Is writing good for your health? Scientific studies on the impact of writing on health - both emotional and physical - show remarkable results, supporting what those who love to read and write have known all along: the written word is powerful medicine. Where do writing, spirituality, and wellness meet? This course explores that intersection through a variety of texts, discussion and written responses. In addition, students will learn the sort of writing that has been found to be healing and have the opportunity to experience its potential through journaling and creative writing. This course includes a service-learning component, in which students will perform some tasks off-campus in the local community.

For more information, contact Gail Radley, Ph.D., at gradley@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.10: Self and World

This course is offered to first-year Bonner Program students only. It is designed to help students understand the forces that shape the individual as that individual acts in the world and the relationship of the self to the community and the ways that each shape each other. In this course, students read several texts that deal with the relationship of the individual to the community with a focus either on the way the community shapes the individual or vice versa. They will have to reflect on different situations through essays and discussions in which they propose ways to positively influence and understand others.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Greg Sapp, Ph.D., at gsapp@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.30: Healthy Religion and Sick Religion

This course is designed to help students think critically and intelligently about religion and its role in today's world. This course examines key topics including religion and self-transformation, religion and violence and freedom of religion as a human right. Through this course, students will develop an understanding of the ways in which religion serves both to heal and empower persons and communities and to promote violence and fraud in the name of God. This class is aimed to help first-year students gain a greater appreciation for the complex role that religion plays in today's world and learn the interpretive and analytical skills necessary to critically evaluate the religious dimension of human life. Students will research a contemporary instance of the violation of the human right of religious freedom, prepare a paper on their research and propose an action plan for how the United States should address this instance of abuse.

For more information, contact Phillip Lucas, Ph.D., at plucas@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.37: Diversity in the 21st Century Classroom

In this course, students will examine the meaning of diversity and its relation to global education. Through literature and film, they will discuss the broad definition of diversity, focusing on the study of race, ethnicity, language, gender, social class, sexual orientation, religion and emotional and physical disabilities. Students will write an action plan for community involvement based on readings and field experiences.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Elizabeth Heins, Ph.D. at eheins@stetson.edu.

FSEM 100.49: Food, Health, and Controversy

In this course, students will have lively discussions about food (fast, organic, wild, vegan, ethnic, and food stuffs, among others). In their exploration of food, ideas of nutrition and their personal and community health will be discussed. How does popular culture influence what food individuals purchase and consume? How does the media affect perceptions of what is healthy or nutritious? What do individuals need to know to make thoughtful choices about food? Together students will endeavor to discover what options they have for taking action to address food-related issues in their lives.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Tara Schuwerk, Ph.D. at tschuwer@stetson.edu.

HLSC 303V: Global Health

This course introduces students to the values, concepts and functions of public health applied to solving global health problems. Students will learn how social, economic, political, environmental and cultural factors influence and interact with global health challenges. Students will also learn about the global burden of disease, risk factors and key measures to address the burden of disease in cost-effective ways. With an interdisciplinary focus on low- and middle-incomes countries and the health of the poor, this course will cover key concepts and frameworks in a practical context of global health issues.

For more information, contact Asal Mohamadi Johnson, Ph. D., M.P.H. at ajohnso2@stetson.edu

MKTG 391/JS: Social Marketing

This course will examine issues of social responsibility in business and how marketing theory and techniques may be used to promote more environmentally and socially conscious business practices (profit and nonprofit). In general, social marketing techniques are used to influence individuals or groups to change their behavior in order to improve social goods such as individual health, the environment and the community. Students will develop a report explaining an issue of social responsibility in business and a related social marketing plan that has or is currently being implemented in the marketplace, as well as develop a social marketing plan for an organization in the local community.

For more information, contact Michelle DeMoss, Ph.D., at mdemoss@stetson.edu.

PHIL 309V: Feminist Philosophy

This course focuses primarily on gender discrimination, although it also highlights how differences of race, sexuality and culture may intersect with gender experiences. In addition, the course focuses on the proposed solutions of how women can achieve equality and empowerment in a world that seems to challenge their equality. Students will devise a thesis based on class readings that address feminist issues. In this thesis, they will propose solutions to a variety of different feminist issues covered in class.

For more information, contact Melinda Hall, Ph.D, at mchall@stetson.edu.

POLI 427V: Democracy and Political Participation

In this course, students examine the theoretical and practical relationships between democracy and the political participation of groups and individual citizens. Students take an in-depth look at how and why citizens get involved in politics in order to understand and combat the growing lack of interest in democratic politics, or “civic disengagement.” Students are expected to critically analyze theories about political participation as well as possible participatory and elite-restraining institutional reforms. Students will interview local political activists in the community and complete a qualitative analysis of their answers in order to develop a theory of democracy. Students cover topics such as how and why activists get involved and whether civic disengagement is threatening the civic health of the country.

For more information, contact William Nylen, Ph.D., at wnylen@stetson.edu.

PUBH 140V: Introduction to Public Health

This course focuses on the many different aspects of public health, such as epidemiology, public policy, environmental issues and safety procedures. In addition, this course highlights the intersection of these various aspects of public health with social inequities, such as the role that race, gender, and socioeconomic status have in regards to one's health. Students will complete the Stetson Public Health Challenge, where they identify a public health issue on campus and demonstrate how to better that issue.

*This course meets either the theory or the service-learning course requirement.

For more information, contact Nicole Porther, Ph.D., at nporther@stetson.edu.

SOCI 304S: Social Inequality

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of how identity, power and institutions interrelate to produce social inequality. Using the concept of belonging, we will examine how place and social location is used determined by one’s inclusion or exclusion in a social order. Drawing from C. Wright Mills idea that personal troubles are public issues, students will explore various dimensions such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class and national of social origin, students will understand how social inequality is organized and experienced in US society. In this course, students will present debates on various issues of social inequalities, in which they propose solutions to current issues.

For more information, contact Sharmaine Jackson, Ph.D., at sjackson1@stetson.edu.

SOCI 337V: Sociology of Developing Societies

This class aims to recognize and articulate the diversity of the developing world in terms of geographic endowments and economic development level, apply theories of development to an individual country, interrogate the role of the West in the development of other countries and propose solutions to inequality and other development questions. Students must submit a weekly reflection paper on their reading of social issues in developing societies where they begin with a concept in developing societies and then further expand into an analysis of it and how it, and the people implementing it, impact social issues. Students will also write a paper on the current developmental situation of one country, where they analyze the social issues and possible solutions of their chosen country.

For more information, contact Rachel Core, Ph.D., at rcore@stetson.edu.