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Ana Servigna, Ph.D.

Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology

Dr. Ana Servigna is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Public Health. She received a Fulbright scholarship and moved from Venezuela to the U.S. to complete a Ph.D. in anthropology at Syracuse University, NY. Prior to coming to Stetson University, Dr. Servigna was a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University (New Orleans) and an associate professor at the School of Architecture at Zulia State University (Venezuela). Her teaching and research interests are on theories of space and place, politics, social inequality and urban design with a focus on environmental issues and architecture.
Dr. Servigna's research looks at how moral and ethical issues are spatially enacted through cities' spaces and urbanism. Currently, she is interested in new trends of immigration in the U.S. by studying the Venezuelan diaspora in Florida.

Education

  • Ph.D., anthropology, Syracuse University
  • Certificate of Advanced Study, Latin America and the Caribbean, Syracuse University
  • Mg.Sc. anthropology, Zulia State University, Venezuela
  • Architect, Zulia State University, Venezuela

Course Topics

  • ANTH 101 S/B: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
  • ANTH 201P: Introduction to Physical Anthropology
  • ANTH 290: Special Topic - Latin American Pop Culture

Research Interests

  • Urban anthropology and social issues
  • Anthropology, architecture and urban design
  • Sustainable architecture and ecological design
  • State-sponsored urban development and social housing
  • Urban aesthetic, ethic and morality
  • Architecture, urbanism, politics, history and representation

Publications

  • 2015 "Whose Plaza Is It, Anyway? Chávez's Bolivarianism and Contested Public Space in Caracas, Venezuela," The Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology, November 20 (3)
  • 2015 "I've Got a House but No Room for My Hammock: the Tragedy of the Commons, or another Common Tragedy among the Añú of Sinamaica, Venezuela." In Sustainability as Myth and Practice in the Global City edited by M. Checker, C. Isenhour, and G. McDonogh. New York: Cambridge University Press, Pp.139-156. (Co-author A. Fernandez)

Faculty Expert

  • Urban anthropology
  • Architecture
  • Urban design

Contact Information