Stetson University

College of Arts and Sciences

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Sociology Courses

The numbers in parentheses adjacent to the course name are the number of course units earned upon satisfactory completion of the course.

SOCI 101S Introduction to Sociology (1). This course surveys the major theories, research methods, and recent issues and findings in sociology. Whether exploring gender, crime, the family, religion, race, social class, social movements, or other social phenomena, students will discover how and why people behave as they do, and in so doing learn more about themselves and the social world. By analyzing the effects of group relations on people's behavior; how individuals, groups, social institutions, community, and culture affect each other; and the impact of social processes on our lives, students will discern the relevance of sociology to their own lives and to fostering social justice. Offered every fall and spring semester.

SOCI 215R Population, Society, and Environment (1). Analysis of population trends and phenomena in relation to their social setting and the environment; fertility, mortality, migration as components of population change; problems of population growth. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 255S Sociology of Families and Intimate Relationships (1). What is a family? How can it both provide support, love, and intimacy, and yet provoke conflict, turmoil, and violence? How do today's families differ from those of the past? Have hooking up, cohabitation, and gay and lesbian relationships replaced traditional marriages? What consequences do such changes have for individuals and society? We will analyze the social bases of contemporary U.S. families and intimate relationships and their organization and operation as a social institution, a primary group, and a set of roles and examine the interrelationships among gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality as central features affecting these phenomena. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 263J Community Organizing for Social Change (1). This course is not for the faint-hearted. This course is for students interested in gaining practical, resume-building experience by getting their hands dirty in the passionate field of community organizing. Students will work on a real community campaign to build participatory democracy in Florida. In the process students will develop experience and skills in volunteer organizing, leadership development, public speaking, media outreach, and more. In tandem with their community organizing work in the field, students will come to class to report on their field experiences, share ideas and issues, discuss readings, and plan further organizing. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 285, 385, 485 Independent Study (0.5, 1). Students may take more than one SOCI 285, 385, or 485 course during their career with different titles and contents.

SOCI 290, 390, 490 Topical Seminar (1). A course initiated by student interest, contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 290, 390, or 490 course during their career with different titles and contents.

SOCI 302 Criminology (1). Consideration of the extent and nature of crime in the U.S., including theories of crime causation and the nation's response to crime via the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections). Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 304 Social Inequality (1). Everyone knows inequalities exist, but what is the exact nature and extent of inequalities in the United States and the wider world?What are the social impacts of inequalities? And why do inequalities exist? Are inequalities genetic or socially-created, inevitable or reversible? This course pursues answers to these questions, exploring class, race, and gender inequalities locally, nationally, and beyond. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 305S Social Institutions (1). Although social institutions (e.g., education, the media, religion, or medicine) are invisible social forces, they profoundly affect our lives, our society, and our world. This course examines the social and cultural forces that shape and are shaped by contemporary U.S. social institutions. It explores macrosociological relations between institutions and society (e.g., how changes in government funding impact schools) and microsociological dynamics within institutions (e.g., the process and consequences of being labeled a "gifted" student). It considers cross-cultural variations, historical foundations, and transformations of social institutions and their role in maintaining social stability and social inequality. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 309 Collective Behavior and Social Movements (1). Examination of spontaneous, unstructured, and transient patterns of social action, such as mass hysteria, fads, rumors, crowds, riots, and revolutions. Special attention given to the nature of human communication in mass society (public opinion, propaganda, and rumor). Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 312D Gender and Society (1). "Suck it up; be a man!" "Act like a lady!" What do these phrases mean? How do we "do" gender? This course explores the social construction and dynamics of gender; the conditions and events that shape women's and men's identities, interactions, and lives; and their consequences for individuals and society. It analyzes how the social world is structured and operates as a gendered phenomenon and the role of culture and social movements in reinforcing or challenging existing social arrangements. The intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality are highlighted as fundamental features influencing experiences and outcomes, particularly social inequality. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 337 Sociology of Developing Societies (1). Analysis of social change, social movements, stratification, economic dependency, and political conflict in developing countries, with special emphasis on Latin America, Africa, and the African Diaspora. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 355 Sociology of the City (1). Consideration of the origin and growth of cities and the metropolitan community; nature of social relations in metropolitan areas; spatial organization of the urban community; community problems. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 363J-JS Community-Based Research (1). This junior seminar course focuses on the uses of social science theory, methodology, and data for policy, program, planning, and evaluation applications in the community. It is designed to facilitate faculty, student, and community collaboration to plan and conduct research to address social, environmental, and/or justice issues identified by the community. Students learn to apply the theories and methods they have mastered in the classroom to real problems in the community, and communities gain access to the rich research resources of the University. The result is a powerful learning experience for students and faculty, as well as a valuable research product for communities. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequalitycourse.

SOCI 370S Work, Occupations, and Professions (1). Work occupies a dominant role in our lives: it defines and identifies us, dictates how we spend our time, and significantly impacts the quality of our lives and our places in society. With changes in the global economy, many Americans experience less job security and struggle to balance the demands of work and family. This course analyzes the social organization and meaning of work and trends in occupational and industrial structures and the labor market in contemporary U.S. society. It explores the relationships among gender, race/ethnicity, and social class and work and the causes and consequences of globalization on work. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 372 Social and Cultural Change (1). Study of the nature, causation, and consequences of social and cultural change in diverse social settings; processes of change, including adoption and diffusion of innovation, social movements, and instigated, directed change; visions of desirable futures. Focuses on the U.S., but also examines the structure and dynamics of global interdependence as they relate to processes of social and cultural change in the U.S. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 379 Sociology of Law (1). This course examines law as a social phenomenon by defining law as a dependent variable. As they explore the relationship between law and people, social conditions, and ideas, students engage in a systematic analysis of exactly what variation the sociology of law needs to explain, identify significant social factors that account for this variation, and then explore a number of theoretical formulations about the relationship between the two. In the end, students understand better how to make sense out of heretofore scattered empirical findings, how to more accurately predict legal variation, and how to identify new avenues of possible research. Prerequisite: SOCI 101 or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 397 Internship in Sociology (0.5, 1). Opportunity to explore a substantive area of sociology in an applied setting; setting, structure, requirements, and outcomes are negotiated with the individual instructor guiding the internship. Prerequisite: major or minor status and permission of instructor. Students may take more than one SOCI 397 course during their career with different titles and contents.

SOCI 495 Sociological Theories (1). Sociological theory enables students to think more deeply about the social world, from work and religion to sex and love to prisons, politics and global capitalism. This course explores these and other subjects through the ideas of major classical and contemporary sociological theorists, including Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, Max Weber,Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, Anthony Giddens, Jurgen Habermas, and more. Theory traditions covered include conflict theory, structural-functionalist theory, rational choice theory, symbolic interactionism, and theories of modernity and postmodernity. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: 3 Course Units in sociology. Co-requisite: SOCI 496. Prerequisite to SOCI 497, SOCI 498Q, and SOCI 499.

SOCI 496 Social Research Methods (1). Study of the processes of social inquiry and an introduction to research methods for the social sciences, with particular attention to the design and execution of quantitative and qualitative social research, including the nature, goals, and logic of social research and the structure and processes of inquiry. Topics include problem formulation; causation; the role of theory in social research; conceptualization, operationalization, and measurement; reliability and validity; sampling; quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection; coding; introduction to data analysis; and ethical and political issues of social research. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: 3 Course Units in Sociology. Co-requisite: SOCI 495. Prerequisite to SOCI 497, SOCI 498Q, and SOCI 499.

SOCI 497 Methods and Styles of Social Science Communication (1). This writing course emphasizes various types of social science documents (such as book and journal reviews, abstracts, annotated bibliographies, and the required proposal for the research thesis); communicating with lay audiences; and delivering professional presentations of scholarly work. A major component of the course is preparation of the research proposal that serves as the basis for the senior research project in SOCI 499. Students orally present their proposals for departmental approval. Offered every spring semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 495 and SOCI 496. Co-requisite: SOCI 498Q. Prerequisite to SOCI 499. (This course is open to other social science majors and minors, with permission of the instructor.)

SOCI 498Q Tools for Quantitative Analysis (1). Introduction to applied statistical concepts, with emphasis on the use of bivariate and multivariate statistical procedures for the analysis of data from sample surveys. Offered every spring semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 495 and SOCI 496. Co-requisite: SOCI 497. Prerequisite to SOCI 499. (This course is open to other social science majors and minors, with permission of the instructor.)

SOCI 499 Senior Project (1). Research course in which students execute the research project they proposed in SOCI 497 and present the findings of their studies in an oral presentation and in a final report which contains an abstract; a problem statement and research objectives or hypotheses; identification of the main concepts and variables, including their definition, operationalization, and measurement; a review of the pertinent theoretical and empirical literature; a description of the study design and execution; findings and their interpretation; summary, conclusions, implications, and suggestions for further research; a bibliography; and a copy of the research instrument. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the senior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 495, SOCI 496, SOCI 497, and SOCI 498.

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