Department of English

Fall 2012 Course Schedule

 

Undergraduate Courses

 

ENGL 240A.01: Reading Non-Fiction                                                 J. Pearson

CRN 4510   MWF   9:00-9:50 AM

 

Non-fiction includes autobiography, historical narrative, personal essay, art criticism, science writing, journalism, and just about any form of writing that claims to be factual, whether or not it reflects truth as we know it.  In this course, we’ll read a variety of non-fiction texts, including autobiography, historical narrative, personal essay, art criticism, nature writing, literary journalism, and other forms of writing that claim to be factual, whether or not they reflect truth as we know it.   We will consider these texts as both art and as artifacts of the world that they describe.  Students will write a series of brief approach papers and three short essays.  Texts in this course will include The Glass Castle, Maus I, The Midwife, Into the Wild, The Art of the Personal Essay, In Cold Blood, and other works of non-fiction. 

 

 

ENGL 241A.01: Reading Narrative                                                                  M. Powell

CRN 4511     MW    2:30 – 3:45 PM

 

This course introduces students to questions, concepts, and perspectives that inform the study of narrative. It emphasizes close, attentive, critical reading as well as different interpretive approaches to narrative texts. It examines texts of many different eras, cultures, and genres; it introduces critical terms, conventions, and discourses appropriate to the study of narrative.

 


ENGL 242A.01: Reading Lyric                                                               J. Davis  

CRN 4512     TR       4:00-5:15 PM

 

Introduces students to questions, concepts, and perspectives that inform the study of the lyric, including but not limited to poetry.  It also introduces students to a variety of lyric genres, and to lyrics produced within many different eras and cultures.  The course emphasizes attentive critical reading, as well as thought about individual readers’ interpretative choices.

 

 

ENGL 320.01: History & Theory of Rhetoric                                                M. Barnes 

CRN 4925     MW    4:00-5:15 PM

 

Focuses on Western rhetorical history and theory, moving from classical through Romantic to modern eras.  Course examines contributions made by major figures (such as Plato, Coleridge, Nietzsche, and Cixous) and issues of authority in discourse.

 

 

ENGL 342W.JS: Healing & Wholeness in Contemp Lit                  S. Campbell

CRN 4927     TR       1:00-2:15 PM                    

 

Most of us realize how therapeutic reading can be.  We find ourselves entering the world described in the pages of a good book and becoming involved with the characters therein.  We often close the cover having gained new insight and ideas.   That is the purpose behind the use of bibliotherapy: to assist readers in expanding their knowledge and understanding of societal and/or world issues or the ways in which they may have been mis-educated or in overcoming the emotional turmoil related to a real-life problem by having him/her read literature on that topic.  The text can then serve as a springboard for discussion and possible resolution of the issue(s) it addresses.   In this course, we will journey through contemporary literature, self-help books, popular literature and chick flicks written by various multicultural writers, such as African American, Asian American, Euro-American and Native American authors to analyze the resolutions offered for the real-life problems members of that group often encounter.

 

 

ENGL 343D2.JS: Feeling Global                                                                        J. Khader

CRN 5399     TR       1:00-2:15 PM

 

You must all be familiar with the famous 1960 photograph of Che Guevara, the international revolutionary figure, in which he is looking off into the distance, gazing into the unknown but communicating a clear message of determination and hope. How can we explain that this picture of Che has become a logo that adorns a wide range of commodities such as T-shirts, bikinis, watches, sneakers, key chains, coffee mugs, wallets, backpacks, beach towels and condoms around the world? How can a global symbol of resistance to the capitalist system become one of the most popular iconic brand names, one that is as recognizable today as the Nike swoosh or McDonald’s golden arches?

 

This course examines the diverse ways in which individuals, commodities, and ideas travel, mutate, and become/ feel global, focusing on the extent to which these forms of global culture are implicated in the economic imperatives of neoliberal, global capitalism that have spurred their existence in the first place. We will critically explore how different genres and media such as fiction, film, travelogues, performance art, photographic essays, and literary theory reflect and refract these forms of global culture in the realm of identity, culture, economy, politics, and social relations. Our intention is to understand how global capitalism uses ideological fantasy, in order to appropriate, co-opt, and integrate every aspect of our thoughts and experiences within the system itself, to the extent that even theories of revolution and radical politics begin to replicate the same logic, rhetoric, and values of the dominant economic and political order itself. We will end the course with a critical look at possible theories of global change, with a special attention to the Occupy Movement (OWS) and the Arab Spring.

Readings include Manfred B. Steger’s Globalization: A Very Short Introduction; Iyer’s Video nights in Kathmandu; Guillermo Gomez-Pena, The new world border; Rigoberta Menchu’s Crossing Borders; Michael Casey’s Che’s Afterlife: The Legacy of an Image; Pico Dan Koeppel, Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World; Edward Said’s After the Last Sky; Susan Sontag, Regarding the Pain of Others; and Stuart Bramhall’s 21st Century Revolution. We will also watch different films such as The Matrix, Princesas, and The Battle for Seattle. Requirements: short response papers; an oral presentation; and a longer research paper.

 

ENGL 348.01: Survey of American Literature                                 J. Pearson

CRN 5400   MWF   11:00-11:50 AM

 

The Survey of American Literature offers a broad overview of American literature from the discovery period to the present.  After considering the slippery nature of the terms American and literature, we’ll study the traditional division of American literary history into periods and literary movements while acknowledging the largely artificial nature of these divisions.  All texts will be read in light of their historical and cultural contexts.  Ideas about nature, individualism, human rights, industry and technology, money, personal responsibility, and faith permeate American literature and will inform our daily discussions.

 

This course will be taught as a lecture/discussion.  The main text will be an anthology of American literature.  Course requirements are engaged participation, three short essays, and three exams.

 

 

ENGL 381.01: Text-Theory-Criticism                                                  J. Khader     

CRN 5392     TR       10:00-11:15 AM

 

This course aims to introduce students to contemporary literary theory such as psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism, queer theory, and postcolonial studies that have shaped the principles and assumptions that govern the critical interpretation of literary texts in the last few decades. We will examine how contemporary literary theory help us not only to develop alternative ways of thinking about and responding to literary texts, but also to question at a more fundamental level what we take for granted in our lives.  Furthermore, we will read Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea, as well as various critical interpretations of these novels that draw on these theories. In this way, students will be able to accomplish the following goals: 1) engage key theoretical concepts, principles, and assumptions first hand in the primary theoretical texts themselves; 2) analyze and evaluate how these theoretical principles are actually applied by the critics to the literary texts; and 3) develop their own theoretical approaches to literary texts. Required texts include: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, ed. Vincent B. Leitch et al., ed.; Lois Tyson’s Critical Theory Today; Bram Stoker’s Dracula, eds. Auerbach and Skal (Norton Critical Edition, 1997); and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea, ed. Judith Raiskin (Norton Critical Edition, 1998). Requirements include: Attendance and participation; response papers; 2 short analytical papers; and a research paper.

 

 

ENGL 465.01: Seminar: International Chaucer                               T. Farrell

CRN 5401     TR       2:30-3:45 PM

 

Although Geoffrey Chaucer has often been portrayed as an originator of English literature, he can hardly have imagined himself in such terms.  Rather clearly, Chaucer's ambition lay in his desire to contribute an English voice to fourteenth-century European literary culture, to a textual tradition in several languages that gives some justification to my anachronistic term "international" because, although "nations" like Italy, Spain, France, and the Low Countries did not yet exist, the geographic regions were building distinct literatures on a common and shared base.

 

We will spend the beginning of the semester learning about that shared culture by considering in one way or another the Ćneid, the Consolation of Philosophy, the troubadours, The Romance of the Rose, the poetry of Guillaume de Machaut, and the Italian triumvirate of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio.  The bulk of the course will be devoted to studying Chaucer's absorption of and responses to those traditions in such shorter works as The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and especially  in "the greatest long poem in English," Troilus.  We will conclude by considering the final phase of Chaucer's career, looking hard at 3-4 Canterbury Tales and 1-2 examples from The Legend of Good Women.

 

Students will help to present the "international" backgrounds and serve as discussion leaders for the short poems.  There will be several short writing assignments as well as the seminar essay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGL 465.02: Seminar:  Virginia Woolf                                             K. Kaivola

CRN 5403     TR       11:30-12:45 PM                           

 

Over the past several decades, Virginia Woolf has been elevated to the status of cultural icon.  Today, with her image reproduced on t-shirts, coffee cups, calendars, and magnets, and with the production of numerous films inspired by her work, “Virginia Woolf” evokes multiple and sometimes contradictory meanings:  woman writer, modernist innovator, cultural insider (and outsider), feminist advocate, Bloomsbury radical, married "sapphist", and neurotic suicide—to name just a few.  Her work complicates clear distinctions between art and politics, high and popular culture, masculinity and femininity, straight and gay, text and image.  Paying close attention to the contexts—biographical, aesthetic, cultural, historical, political—as well as the friendships and relationships that shaped Woolf’s life and work, we will follow the trajectory of her work as an artist, public intellectual, and woman through the major texts of the 1920s and 1930s. 

 

Texts:  Jacob’s Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, A Room of One’s Own, Orlando, The Waves, Three Guineas, and Between the Acts.

 

Requirements:  several short papers (or equivalent), presentations, and an independently researched seminar paper on a topic chosen by the student and developed in collaboration with the professor.

 

 

ENGL 499.01: Senior Colloquium                                                        T. Farrell

CRN 4524     MWF   1:30-2:20 PM

 

Provides a review of and further grounding in the methods, materials, and critical approaches appropriate for advanced literary research, culminating in a substantial written project.  Students will pursue in-depth study of a literary topic, discuss typical problems in their writing and research, and participate in groups to read and discuss work in progress.  It includes both written and oral presentation of projects.  Seniors with advanced standing are encouraged to take the course in the fall.  (Prerequisite: three units from ENGL 220, ENGL 240A, ENGL 241A, ENGL 242A, and ENGL 243A, plus EH 381, and one course numbered 400 or above.)

 

Creative Writing Courses for Undergraduates

Fall 2012

 

 

ENCW 215A.01: Multi-Genre Workshop      T. Witek, A. Dehnart & M. Powell

CRN 4931     MW    12:00-1:15 PM

 

Taught by three different practitioners, this course asks you to write in three different literary genres: poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction, in order to develop a composite portfolio of your work. This course is especially appropriate for those who’d like to test the pleasures and perils of working in literary forms which vary technically, historically, and in the marketplace.

 

 

ENCW 312A.30: Fiction Workshop                                                     M. Powell

CRN 4744     W        6:00-9:00 PM

 

This course introduces and helps students develop their skills in such fiction techniques as characterization, plot, setting, point of view, and style. You are required to read all assigned material, complete all writing exercises, offer written critiques of peer work, participate in discussions, and workshop two stories.

 

 

ENCW 313A.30: Poetry Workshop                                         T. Witek

CRN 4527     T          6:00-9:00 PM

 

This course is an intensive workshop in poetic method. Over the course of the semester, each student will construct a portfolio of eight poems, at least four of them using techniques other than free verse. We will examine several books of contemporary poetry for strategies and attend campus reading events.  Crossover students from other studio arts are welcome and encouraged to work in combinatory forms. Graduate students will do an extra review project.

Permission of instructor required.

 


ENCW 413.30: Advanced Poetry Workshop                                                T. Witek

CRN 4582                 T          6:00-9:00 PM

 

This course is an intensive workshop in poetic method. Over the course of the semester, each student will construct a portfolio of eight poems, at least four of them using techniques other than free verse. We will examine several books of contemporary poetry for strategies and attend campus reading events.  Crossover students from other studio arts are welcome and encouraged to work in combinatory forms. Graduate students will do an extra review project.

Permission of instructor required.

 

 

GRADUATE COURSES

 

ENGL 520.01: History & Theory of Rhetoric                                                M. Barnes 

CRN 4998     MW    4:00-5:15 PM

 

Focuses on Western rhetorical history and theory, moving from classical through Romantic to modern eras.  Course examines contributions made by major figures (such as Plato, Coleridge, Nietzsche, and Cixous) and issues of authority in discourse.

 

 

ENGL 565.01: Seminar: International Chaucer                               T. Farrell

CRN 5402     TR       2:30-3:45 PM

 

Although Geoffrey Chaucer has often been portrayed as an originator of English literature, he can hardly have imagined himself in such terms.  Rather clearly, Chaucer's ambition lay in his desire to contribute an English voice to fourteenth-century European literary culture, to a textual tradition in several languages that gives some justification to my anachronistic term "international" because, although "nations" like Italy, Spain, France, and the Low Countries did not yet exist, the geographic regions were building distinct literatures on a common and shared base.

 

We will spend the beginning of the semester learning about that shared culture by considering in one way or another the Ćneid, the Consolation of Philosophy, the troubadours, The Romance of the Rose, the poetry of Guillaume de Machaut, and the Italian triumvirate of Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio.  The bulk of the course will be devoted to studying Chaucer's absorption of and responses to those traditions in such shorter works as The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and especially  in "the greatest long poem in English," Troilus.  We will conclude by considering the final phase of Chaucer's career, looking hard at 3-4 Canterbury Tales and 1-2 examples from The Legend of Good Women.

 

Students will help to present the "international" backgrounds and serve as discussion leaders for the short poems.  There will be several short writing assignments as well as the seminar essay.

 

 

ENGL 565.02: Seminar:  Virginia Woolf                                             K. Kaivola

CRN 5404     TR       11:30-12:45 PM                              

 

Over the past several decades, Virginia Woolf has been elevated to the status of cultural icon.  Today, with her image reproduced on t-shirts, coffee cups, calendars, and magnets, and with the production of numerous films inspired by her work, “Virginia Woolf” evokes multiple and sometimes contradictory meanings:  woman writer, modernist innovator, cultural insider (and outsider), feminist advocate, Bloomsbury radical, married "sapphist", and neurotic suicide—to name just a few.  Her work complicates clear distinctions between art and politics, high and popular culture, masculinity and femininity, straight and gay, text and image.  Paying close attention to the contexts—biographical, aesthetic, cultural, historical, political—as well as the friendships and relationships that shaped Woolf’s life and work, we will follow the trajectory of her work as an artist, public intellectual, and woman through the major texts of the 1920s and 1930s.  Graduate students will be expected to become conversant, through independent study of criticism and/or theory, of a significant dimension of Woolf’s work.

 

Texts:  Jacob’s Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, A Room of One’s Own, Orlando, The Waves, Three Guineas, and Between the Acts.

 

Requirements:  several short papers (or equivalent), presentations, and an independently researched seminar paper, demonstrating familiarity with recent criticism, on a topic chosen by the student.

 

 

ENGL 581.01: Text-Theory-Criticism                                                  J. Khader     

CRN 5395     TR       10:00-11:15 AM

 

This course aims to introduce students to contemporary literary theory such as psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism, queer theory, and postcolonial studies that have shaped the principles and assumptions that govern the critical interpretation of literary texts in the last few decades. We will examine how contemporary literary theory help us not only to develop alternative ways of thinking about and responding to literary texts, but also to question at a more fundamental level what we take for granted in our lives.  Furthermore, we will read Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea, as well as various critical interpretations of these novels that draw on these theories. In this way, students will be able to accomplish the following goals: 1) engage key theoretical concepts, principles, and assumptions first hand in the primary theoretical texts themselves; 2) analyze and evaluate how these theoretical principles are actually applied by the critics to the literary texts; and 3) develop their own theoretical approaches to literary texts. Required texts include: The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, ed. Vincent B. Leitch et al., ed.; Lois Tyson’s Critical Theory Today; Bram Stoker’s Dracula, eds. Auerbach and Skal (Norton Critical Edition, 1997); and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea, ed. Judith Raiskin (Norton Critical Edition, 1998). Requirements include: Attendance and participation; response papers; 2 short analytical papers; and a research paper.

 

 

ENCW 512.30: Fiction Workshop                                                        M. Powell

CRN 5145     W        6:00-9:00 PM

 

This course introduces and helps students develop their skills in such fiction techniques as characterization, plot, setting, point of view, and style. You are required to read all assigned material, complete all writing exercises, offer written critiques of peer work, participate in discussions, and workshop two stories.

ENCW 513.30: Poetry Workshop                                                        T. Witek

CRN 4932     T          6:00-9:00 PM

 

This course is an intensive workshop in poetic method. Over the course of the semester, each student will construct a portfolio of eight poems, at least four of them using techniques other than free verse. We will examine several books of contemporary poetry for strategies and attend campus reading events.  Crossover students from other studio arts are welcome and encouraged to work in combinatory forms. Graduate students will do an extra review project.

Permission of instructor required.